A garden full of character

Today was gardening day, which means that I spent the afternoon with my friend Nina. 

We planted okra, corn, radishes, cucumbers, and spinach. 

It was also cool to see that the veggies we planted last time are coming along nicely. 

Next time I head out there I will snap a few photos to show you. Nina’s beans are coming in and the bean plant’s flowers are beautiful!

Of course, getting to dig around in the dirt is always fun as well as chats about anything and everything as Nina and I get the work done. 

Seeing Nina’s love of gardening, of establishing a strong homestead, inspires me. She’s truly passionate–this is not a passing fad for her. 

There’s a lot to be learned about sticking something out even during times of failure. Not all of Nina and Jeff’s homesteading adventures worked out at first, yet they kept learning, kept trying. 

Persistence, focus, and dedication are traits that are often discussed but rarely lived out.  

And the fruits of their strong character are evident to me as I look around their farm. 

I am blessed to have friends who are teaching me through their example. 

Good dirt is important

I got to play in the dirt today! 

My fun spring break activity was visiting my friend Nina and helping her get some gardening projects done. 

We re-potted some thyme and spinach, moved a cold frame, and planted potatoes, onions, and garlic. 

Digging around in the dirt is my favorite part of gardening. I enjoyed the dirt stains on my jeans (and having muddy hands). 

My obsession with dirt is a bit odd to some, but it’s such a reminder to me of our lives. 

Most of the time, any problem with your plants can be traced back to the soil. 

Good dirt makes all the difference. 

Nina and I had a lot of fun chatting as we worked. It’s cool to see how the Master Gardener, God the Father, is working in and through our lives as we follow Him each day. 
Covered in dirt, surrounded by kids–real kids and goat kids–the afternoon was filled with good conversation and gorgeous sunshine. 

I couldn’t have asked for a better day.

 This is the first spring break I’ve had in many years and it’s been awesome. 

Farm fun

I spent the afternoon muddy and I loved it! 

My friends, Jeff and Nina, invited me over for lunch. After we ate, I helped Nina replant an evergreen tree. 

I met Jeff and Nina back in October when my dad and I came out to College Weekend. Dad went to Rhema with Jeff, so they’ve been friends for years. 

Their sweet family is so much fun to hang out with! We spent the afternoon chatting and working around their farm. 

They have 3 children, so it was noisy…and awesome! I miss my brothers and sisters. I miss having little people around me. 

Also, all 3 of their goats had twins. 6 kids were romping around the farm. It’s amazing to see God’s creation doing what it’s intended to do: be fruitful and multiply. 

Working outside, digging in the dirt, was a blast. 

Gardening is something that I enjoy and want to do for the rest of my life. There’s something so satisfying about tending a garden and eating from it’s bounty. 

Jeff and Nina work hard on their farm. It’s cool to see their passion and how their children work alongside of them. 

Good Soil Matters

Dirt is the most important part of gardening.

It doesn’t matter how good your seed is if the soil quality is poor. I know of gardeners and farmers who pay big bucks to up the quality of their soil.

What makes good dirt? Nice, loamy soil is always desired over soil with an overabundance of clay.

Loamy is a fancy word for light and fluffy. A more technical way to describe “loamy” is soil that is nutrient rich and not too hard so that it can easily receive moisture.

Are you wondering why I am describing good soil? There is a point, I promise! I’ve seen many people, families, and other organizations described using gardening terms. It’s really the best example because you see the results of good and bad gardening conditions all around you—even if you don’t garden yourself.

How often have you heard someone refer to the importance of good foundations? Probably a lot. Goodness knows I have!

The soil in a garden matters.The “why” behind our decisions matters. Making poor decisions is the same as planting seeds in poor soil. The results will always be less than desirable.

Mediocrity can be defined as careless, ill-planned, and poorly executed plans that lead to a careless, ill-planned, and poorly executed life.

I know of people who spend more time picking out their clothes than they do on major decisions such as work, family, and money.

Mediocre gardens and people are everywhere. Both can be easily spotted out because poor quality is always noticeable.

That’s not the kind of life I want to have.

Pay attention to your soil, the “why” behind what you do. Fruitfulness is the reward of the diligent.